Sharad Pawar, who is 76 and in his third stint at MCA chief, does not qualify to continue in his capacity as per the Lodha panel recommendations. © Getty Images

Sharad Pawar, who is 76 and in his third stint at MCA chief, does not qualify to continue in his capacity as per the Lodha panel recommendations. © Getty Images

Sharad Pawar has stepped down from his position as the president of the Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA) in a bid to abide by the Lodha Committee’s recommendations.

Pawar, who is 76 and in his third stint at MCA chief, does not qualify to continue in his capacity as per the recommendations, which fix the age-limit for an administrator at 70 and bar them from serving consecutive terms.

PV Shetty, the MCA joint secretary, confirmed on Saturday (December 17) afternoon that Pawar had called a meeting of the managing committee earlier in the day to tender his resignation. The committee is yet to decide on the next course of action, given that the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) are still involved in a tussle with the Lodha panel in the Supreme Court.

The development came just two days after the apex court came down hard on Anurag Thakur, the BCCI president, saying he could land in jail if charges of perjury were proven.

The court said that Thakur “appears to have prima facie committed perjury” in the matter of writing to the International Cricket Council (ICC) to intervene and say that implementation of Lodha reforms would amount to government interference in the board’s running.

Thakur had originally denied that he sought a letter to that effect from Shashank Manohar, the ICC chairman, only claiming that he had asked for clarifications from the sport’s governing body.

The ICC does not permit government intervention in the functioning of its member boards, with the possibility of a suspension not ruled out.

Notably, Pawar had spoken out against the Supreme Court on Friday, saying, “While I am closely associated with cricket, the matter is in the Supreme Court. The court is now going to decide how cricket will be organised. Till yesterday, they were guiding how to run the country. Now, they are also guiding the sports organisation.”

Pawar, a senior politician, was also the president of the BCCI from 2005 to 2008 and was also the ICC’s president from 2010 to 2012.