"Cricket cannot die in Pakistan. We have also survived without international cricket at home since 2009." © Getty Images

“Cricket cannot die in Pakistan. We have also survived without international cricket at home since 2009.” © Getty Images

Javed Miandad, the former Pakistan captain, has urged the Pakistan Cricket Board to stop wasting time on reviving the cricketing ties with their arch-rivals India, and instead focus on improving their financial structure.

India and Pakistan have not played any bilateral series since 2012 — where the latter drew the two-match Twenty20 International series 1-1 before defeating India 2-1 in the One-Day Internationals — owing to political differences.

“They don’t want to play with us so be it,” Miandad, 60, told the media at a function in Karachi on Friday (January 5). “Our cricket will not die if we don’t play with India. We should move on and forget about them.”

The last time these two sides met was in the 2017 Champions Trophy final at The Oval with Pakistan pulling off a stunning 180-run.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India’s proposed FTP structure for the 2019-2023 cycle doesn’t feature any India-Pakistan bilateral series, while Pakistan are also not amongst India’s six proposed opponents for the World Test Championship beginning in 2019.

Miandad, a veteran of 124 Tests, felt there was no need for PCB to ‘beg’ BCCI for bilateral games. “They haven’t played against us since the last ten years, so what? Has our cricket gone down? No, we have done well,” he pointed out. “The Champions Trophy win is an example. Cricket cannot die in Pakistan. We have also survived without international cricket at home since 2009.”

He also had suggestions for PCB regarding the usage of their financial resources. “Today the PCB is financially stable but there is a need for proper accountability of where the money that comes from the ICC is spent,” he said.

“There is a need to reduce the administrative expenses of the board and get rid (of) this army of advisors, consultants and employees. The PCB can easily function without paying such heavy salaries to an over-sized staff.”